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Language and Culture

Resources

Various samples of language and cultural programs used within Native America today. Selected to inspire different teaching methodologies.

A Model for Indigenous Language Revival

The data on language endangerment indicates that many Native American languages are moving from a language revitalization scenario to a language revival scenario. It is therefore time to discuss the distinct methods and processes involved in language revival. This paper will offer such a model.

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Babies Can Learn Their First Lullabies in the Womb

An infant can recognize a lullaby heard in the womb for several months after birth, potentially supporting later speech development. This is indicated in a new study at the University of Helsinki.

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Babies Who Hear Two Languages at Home Develop Advantages in Attention

In the study, infants who are exposed to more than one language show better attentional control than infants who are exposed to only one language. This means that exposure to bilingual environments should be considered a significant factor in the early development of attention in infancy, the researchers say, and could set the stage for lifelong cognitive benefits.

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Benefits of Indigenous Language Learning

A scholarly article from the University of Oregon, reflecting upon the benefits of indigenous language learning for Native Americans and all other individuals. This article provides researched backed statements that prove indigenous language learning increases academic success, and also an individuals health & well-being.

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Bilingual Preschoolers Show Stronger Inhibitory Control

For students in preschool, speaking two languages may be better than one, especially for developing inhibitory control. That idea isn’t new, but a new study took a longitudinal approach to examine the bilingual advantage hypothesis, which suggests that the demands associated with managing two languages confer cognitive advantages that extend beyond the language domain.

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Cultural Continuity as a Determinant of Indigenous Peoples’ Health

A metasynthesis of qualitative research in Canada and the United States: As a strengths-based alternative to Western notions of enculturation and acculturation theory, cultural
continuity describes the integration of people within their culture and the methods through which traditional knowledge is maintained and transmitted.

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Cultural Continuity as a Hedge Against Suicide in Canada’s First Nations

This research report examines self-continuity and its role as a protective factor against suicide.

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Cultural Continuity, Traditional Indigenous language, and Diabetes in Alberta First Nations: a mixed methods study

An exploratory sequential mixed methods approach to study the association between cultural continuity, self-determination, and diabetes prevalence in First Nations in Alberta, Canada.

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Early Childhood Educators Hold Key to Children’s Communication Skills

Researchers have completed a new examination of peer-reviewed science that reveals how early childhood educators can ignite the growth of language and communication skills in infants and toddlers. Their conclusion: it takes more than baby talk.

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Early Learning and the Developing Brain – Dr. Patricia K. Kuhl (Video)

A YouTube video describing education within childhood and the development of the brain. The video is titled: ECE Water Cooler Conference 2016 “Early Learning and the Developing Brain” Dr. Patricia K. Kuhl

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Healing Through Language: Positive Physical Health Effects of Indigenous Language Use

This article summarizes existing work that indicates language maintenance and revitalization efforts result in health-related benefits for Native Americans and other indigenous populations.

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Learning Languages is a Workout for Brains, Both Young and Old

A short research article by Victoria M. Indivero and supported by the National Science Foundation, discussing the numerous positive benefits of learning a second language has upon the brain.

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National Science Foundation Website

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 “to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense…” NSF is vital because we support basic research and people to create knowledge that transforms the future.

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Native Language Immersion

A research project of the American Indian College Fund, which delves into Native American language immersion schools and projects. This piece focuses on successful indigenous language immersion elements and strategies. This resource also discusses many proven community benefits that are associated with Native American language programs.

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Neurobiology of Spirituality

A group of studies that show how the brain responds to spirituality.

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