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Curriculum development and teaching methodologies for effective instruction strategies. Learning materials include: educational prototypes and teaching guidelines.

Cognitive Scientists ID Mechanism Central to Early Childhood Learning, Social Behavior

A study from Indiana University provides compelling evidence for a new and possibly dominant way for social partners to coordinate joint attention, key for parent-child communication and early language learning. These studies could also have major implications for the treatment of children with early social-communication impairment, such as autism, where joint caregiver-child attention with respect to objects and events is a key issue.

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Culture Card: A Guide to Build Cultural Awareness – American Indian and Alaskan Native

The purpose of this guide is to provide basic information for Federal disaster responders and other service providers who may be deployed or otherwise assigned to provide or coordinate services in American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities.

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Early Childhood Educators Hold Key to Children’s Communication Skills

Researchers have completed a new examination of peer-reviewed science that reveals how early childhood educators can ignite the growth of language and communication skills in infants and toddlers. Their conclusion: it takes more than baby talk.

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Early Learning and the Developing Brain – Dr. Patricia K. Kuhl (Video)

A YouTube video describing education within childhood and the development of the brain. The video is titled: ECE Water Cooler Conference 2016 “Early Learning and the Developing Brain” Dr. Patricia K. Kuhl

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Interactive Music Classes Improve Babies’ Social Development, Communication

Past research has found that infants even as young as a few months old respond positively to music. A new study has discovered that interactive musical training can improve communication and social development as well as increase certain brain responses.

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More Than Recess: How Playing On the Swings Helps Kids Learn to Cooperate

The measured, synchronous movement of children on the swings can encourage preschoolers to cooperate on subsequent activities, researchers have found.

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Smithsonian’s Recovering Voices Initiative

The Smithsonian’s recovering voices initiative promotes the documentation and revitalization of the world’s endangered languages and the knowledge preserved in them.

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Speech and the Brain

This article reviews the two areas of the brain that process language for speech and comprehension. It will provide a deeper understanding of the sophisticated elements and processes of language learning.

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The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines 2012

The ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines are descriptions of what individuals can do with language in terms of speaking, writing, listening, and reading in real-world situations in a spontaneous and non-rehearsedcontext.

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The Association Between Lifelong Greenspace Exposure and 3-Dimensional Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Barcelona Schoolchildren

Journal article that describes how lifelong exposure to greenness was positively associated with gray matter volume in the left and right prefrontal cortex and in the left premotor cortex and with white matter volume in the right prefrontal region, in the left premotor region, and in both cerebellar hemispheres. Some of these regions partly overlapped with regions associated with cognitive test scores (prefrontal cortex and cerebellar and premotor white matter), and peak volumes in these regions predicted better working memory and reduced inattentiveness.

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The Goldilocks Effect: Babies Choose ‘Just Right’ Experiences

A scholarly article from the University of Rochester discussing how infants ignore information that is too simple or too complex, focusing instead on situations that are “just right,” according to a new study. Dubbed the “Goldilocks effect” by the people that discovered it, the attention pattern sheds light on how babies learn to make sense of a world full of complex sights, sounds, and movements.

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The Science Behind Music: Why Music Should Be Integrated Into Early Education

They explained that when children learn to play music, their brains begin to develop “neurophysiological distinction” between certain sounds which help improve literacy skills. These newly developed skills lead to an increase in academic achievement.

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Thriving Through Nature – Fostering Children’s Executive Function Skills

Thriving Through Nature describes why the development of executive function skills is important and how experiences in nature can play a critical and positive role in this process.

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Young Children Develop Foundational Skills Through Child-initiated Experiences in a Nature Explore Classroom

Walsh and Gardner (2005) identified six “Key features of experiential learning” (see Table 1) that must be present in order for young children to gain full advantage of hands-on learning. Current literature suggests that children need to engage in experiences of their own initiation (Elkind, 2007; Greenman, 1988; Jones & Cooper, 2006). Children need the freedom to explore, to direct their own play under the watchful eye of knowing adults (Almon & Miller, 2009; Copple & Bredekamp, 2009).

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